Blink of an Eye

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Episode 34: Death Be Gone, Part 2

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This is the final episode of season 1, and the conclusion of the “Death Be Gone” two-parter. Just like the night before, Louise wakes up to a crisis: an alarm blaring, a slew of medical staff running into the room, an urgency to bring Archer back from the brink. This time, though, it’s more serious, and everything is on the line. Louise takes listeners into the heaviness, the fear, and the evil in that ICU room, both during the moments of chaos and the moments of breathless waiting, sharing the text messages she wrote and the prayers she prayed while waiting for Archer to turn the corner. Now that she sees even more acutely how things can go wrong in hospitals, and the culture of silence that keeps families in the dark, Louise wrestles with two seemingly insurmountable tasks: How to get answers, and how to forgive.

In this episode, you will hear excerpts from Louise’s interview with Dr. Raymond Talucci, who was the Acting Chief of Trauma at AtlantiCare Hospital in Atlantic City, New Jersey, while Archer was a patient there. This is the episode where Dr. Talucci meets Louise and more visibly becomes a part of the story. 

Join Louise for this episode of Blink of an Eye: Episode 34: Death Be Gone, Part 2. August 13. Day 9. 

Listen in afterwards to the companion episode for tools to navigate your own traumatic experiences: Trauma Healing Learning: Death Be Gone, Part 2, where Louise takes a closer look at forgiveness, generational wounds, and the consequences of medical errors on trauma healing.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast, and Twitter @blinkofaneyepod

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Trauma Healing Learning: Death Be Gone, Part 2

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If answers are withheld about something that went wrong in a medical context, trauma healing can be delayed years, if not decades. But we can be proactive about our own healing, despite this setback. Forgiveness is powerful. Self-compassion is powerful. It is possible to metabolize the generational wounds we have inherited, and make different choices so we can avoid passing on those wounds to our children. 

Please share this episode with anyone you know who may be dealing with trauma, past or present. If you haven’t already listened to the story behind this lesson, you can find Episode 34: Death Be Gone, Part 2, wherever you get your podcasts.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast, and Twitter @blinkofaneyepod

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Episode 33: Death Be Gone, Part 1

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In this 2-part final episode of season 1, Louise considers the implications for families when things go wrong in hospitals, especially when medical staff remain tight-lipped about what happened, or are unwilling to admit that they don’t know. This isn’t an abstract thought: Last night’s crisis is full of unanswered questions and causes for concern. She’s asked for a meeting with the Chief of Trauma, but so far, no one has responded.

Today in the ICU, Archer receives a prayer shawl from the Senfts’ Cape May church, and Louise settles in for another night alone at his bedside. She can’t stop seeing in her mind that contorted look of pain on Archer’s face, and can’t stop worrying about what effect that pressure in his head and the high dosage of Fentanyl might have on him. The path to recovery may be long, both physically and emotionally, but she knows that the brain is able to heal from even the deepest trauma memories. Join Louise for this episode of Blink of an Eye: Episode 33: Death Be Gone, Part 1. August 12. Day 8.

Listen in afterwards to this week’s companion episode for tools to navigate your own traumatic experiences: Trauma Healing Learning: Death Be Gone, Part 1, where Louise reflects on our unique ability as humans to reflect on our lives and how this helps us make good decisions, and how this can reduce suffering.

Part 2 of "Death Be Gone" will be released on Sunday.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast, and Twitter @blinkofaneyepod

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Trauma Healing Learning: Death Be Gone, Part 1

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The ability to reflect on our lives is what makes us human, able to construct a moral framework, look for meaning, and make decisions. Louise explores this extraordinary human capacity in today’s Trauma Healing Learning. While some things are beyond our control, we can choose how we respond, making decisions that reduce suffering and keep us rooted in the present. Louise also reflects on the 13th-century Sufi poet Rumi, and his poem that speaks of the self as a house.

Please share this episode with anyone you know who may be dealing with trauma, past or present. Each week, you can listen to the latest chapter in Archer’s story, then tune in for the companion Trauma Healing Learning episode. If you haven’t already listened to the story behind this lesson, you can find Episode 33: Death Be Gone, Part 1, wherever you get your podcasts.

Part 2 of "Death Be Gone" will be released on Sunday.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast, and Twitter @blinkofaneyepod

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Episode 32: Peripheral Friends

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Sometimes, support comes from the places you least expect it. The crisis that had Archer in a Silent Scream has passed, at least for now, but Louise has no more answers from the medical team than she did yesterday. She’s also worried about all the narcotics her son has been prescribed. The nurses tell her to ask the doctors, but even the doctors aren’t forthcoming. She isn’t alone, though, not really. This episode is about the friends, even those on the outskirts of our lives, who support us when we can’t support ourselves anymore — sometimes even literally, in the case of Mary Ellen McNally. She questions when to speak up with medical staff and how to do that without alienating or pointing fingers.  And she reflects on life: Faith and hope, and learning when and how to speak up when things don’t feel quite right. 

In this episode, you will hear excerpts of interviews with the following people:

Cathy Giannascoli, a friend in Pennsylvania and the Senft family’s summer neighbor in Cape May, New Jersey.

Mary Ellen McNally, an analytical chemist for Dupont at the time of Archer’s accident, who now works for FMC in their agriculture division. Mary Ellen was one of Louise’s beach friends when Archer was injured on August 5, 2015, in Cape May.

Dr. Raymond Talucci, who was the Acting Chief of Trauma at AtlantiCare Hospital in Atlantic City, New Jersey, the day Archer was medevaced there, and for the duration of his stay.

Join Louise for this episode of Blink of an Eye: Episode 32: Peripheral Friends. August 12. Day 8.

Listen in afterwards to this week’s companion episode for tools to navigate your own traumatic experiences: Trauma Healing Learning: Peripheral Friends where Louise explores secondary trauma, compassion fatigue, and addiction, with a special focus on frontline trauma workers and why medical staff might rely so heavily on narcotics for pain management and the deeper implications for trauma healing.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast, and Twitter @blinkofaneyepod

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Trauma Healing Learning: Peripheral Friends

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Frontline trauma workers may be more prone than others to compassion fatigue, secondary trauma, and substance abuse, but they aren’t the only ones who might find themselves numbing out. Drawing from her experience teaching conflict transformation to workers in crisis situations, as well as her own experience in the ICU, Louise explores what trauma-informed care might look like for the medical community, and gives reasons to believe that, even in times of trauma and tragedy, there is a way through without losing yourself in the process. Louise also explores why medical staff might rely so heavily on narcotics for pain management, and the deeper implications for trauma healing.

Please share this episode with anyone you know who may be dealing with trauma, past or present. Each week, you can listen to the latest chapter in Archer’s story, then tune in for the companion trauma healing learning episode. If you haven’t already listened to the story behind this lesson, you can find Episode 32: Peripheral Friends wherever you get your podcasts.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast, and Twitter @blinkofaneyepod

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

 

Trauma Healing Learning: Stay Alert

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Louise explores why families’ presence bedside to a loved one in an ICU is one of the strongest risk management secrets for hospitals. She gives tips on how family members can be engaged with medical staff, and why medical staff might want to welcome the input of families, including their questions. Join Louise for this provocative look at how hospitals may transform to be more trauma healing informed. 

Please share this episode with anyone you know who may be dealing with trauma, past or present. Each week, you can listen to the latest chapter in Archer’s story, then tune in for the companion trauma healing learning episode. If you haven’t already listened to the story behind this lesson, you can find Episode 31: Stay Alert wherever you get your podcasts.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast 

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Episode 31: Stay Alert

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Louise and her family sat at Archer’s bedside every day and every night, caring for him in the aftermath of his accident. Louise recounts various interactions with nurses and doctors, and the conflicting information she was getting and wonders aloud about the danger this was creating for coordinated medical care. You will be inspired to consider your own role as a family member during a medical trauma, especially in an ICU, where there’s so much going on. Can you see yourself as critical to the well-being of your loved one in more ways than loving support? Join her in an episode that might stir up both medical staff and families for harrowing experiences in the ICU. 

In this episode, you will hear excerpts from Louise’s interview with Dr. Raymond Talucci, who was the Acting Chief of Trauma at AtlantiCare Hospital in Atlantic City, New Jersey, the day Archer was medevaced August 5, 2015, and for the duration of his time there. Five years later, in a rare interview experience, Louise and Dr. Talucci talk about harrowing events in ICUs and his experience working in trauma.

Join Louise for this episode of Blink of an Eye: Episode 31: Stay Alert. August 12. Day 8.

Listen in afterwards to this week’s companion episode for tools to navigate your own traumatic experiences: Trauma Healing Learning: Stay Alert where Louise explores why families’ presence bedside to a loved one in an ICU is one of the strongest risk management secrets, and the deeper implications for trauma healing.

To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast 

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us

Blink of an Eye Podcast Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us

As the heat rushed through Louise’s body, she wondered how dark is the place where she and Billy were in their marriage, or was it dark at all? Past conflicts, unresolved anger can surface suddenly engulfing us in their force with strong bodily sensations. Did past trauma play a role in Louise’ trauma with Archer?  Louise steps into the collective traumatic experience we all had after 9-11 and explores how we may not realize the impact that had on us then, and continues to have on us. She explores what is possible and not possible when we are living a trauma. And she explores how the past resides in our bodies and  how the painful past might also provide opportunity and resiliency even in the midst of new trauma.

Join Louise for this episode of Blink of an Eye: Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us  August 11 DAY 7. 

Listen in afterwards to Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us Trauma Healing Learning

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us Trauma Healing Learning

Blink of an Eye Podcast Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us Trauma Healing Learning

Past trauma, either personally, or collectively takes a toll on our bodies. It can also give us valuable information to handle current traumatic situations.  We may just need to take the time to pause, get curious and ask, “WHY is this bothering me so much? What am I remembering that is triggering this reaction in my body?” Louise gives us tips on how we can sit and get to the heat of it in order to handle it with grace, head-on.  You may want to share these tips with a friend or family member to begin to digest past traumas, or give a lift to someone going through a traumatic situation now. 

If you haven’t listened already to the story behind this learning, please listen in on Episode 30: The Painful Past Informs Us.   

#hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

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